International Food and Nutrition Test Notes Essay

Submitted By Patricia-Ajavon
Words: 2488
Pages: 10

FCS 250
International Foods & Nutrition
Terms
Chapter 7, Eastern Europe

Countries in Eastern Europe

Tatars- Mongol invaders who originally gathered military might under Genghis Khan and who conquered Russia under his grandson’s leadership.

Roma-Nomadic group originating from India that has spread into most parts of Europe and is especially numerous in Romania.

Bliny- Russian pancake, looks like crepe, eaten with fish

Cyrillic alphabet- writing system developed in the 9th–10th century ce for Slavic-speaking peoples of the Eastern Orthodox faith

Paskha- Sort of like a cheesecake, this dish made in Eastern Orthodox countries which consists of food that is forbidden during the fast of Great Lent

Caviar- Salted processed roe (eggs) from sturgeon or some other large fish.

Borsch- eastern European soups made with beets, cabbage, potatoes, or other vegetables and served hot or chilled, often with sour cream

Danube River- Europe's second-longest river, located in Central and Eastern Europe flows through 10 countries: Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary & more.

Kasha- buckwheat, a term used in Central and Eastern Europe especially Russia, Ukraine and the United States for the pseudocereal buckwheat

Knedliky- boiled bread dumplings

Bigos- hearty dish featuring sausage, pork, beef, cabbage, sauerkraut, onions, mushrooms, and seasoning.

Dulceata- Romanian dish of simmered fruits in very heavy syrup.

Kielbasa- Polish sausage made of ground beef and pork, well-seasoned with garlic.

Pierogi- Polish dish consisting of small pockets of dough filled with such foods as mushroom, cheesy potato, or a sweet jam or fruit before they are boiled.

Gulyas (goulash)- Hungarian stew made with chunks of braised meat, seasoned with onion and paprika, and cooked with varying amounts of liquid.

Gnocchi- Yugoslavian small dumplings of wheat or cornmeal, or both
FCS 250
International Foods & Nutrition
Terms
Chapter 8 Italy
Terms, both culture and food ways:

Medici- Powerful Florentine banking family; Cosimo, Lorenzo, and Caterina (carried Florentine cuisine to France when she married King Henri II) are credited with influencing the artistic and culinary renaissance, particularly in the 15th and 16th centuries.
Vatican-
St. Peter’s Basilica- Very large cathedral in the Vatican in Rome.
Sistine Chapel- a chapel in the Apostolic Palace, the official residence of the Pope, in Vatican City. Michelangelo painted the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel.
Pesto- Italian sauce that consists of crushed garlic, basil, and European pine nuts blended with olive oil b
Gelato- ice-cream
Risotto- Italian rice dish cooked in a broth to a creamy consistency.
Polenta- cornmeal boiled into a porridge, and eaten directly or baked, fried or grilled.
Gnocchi- soft dough dumplings, made from wheat flour, egg, cheese, potato, breadcrumbs
Chianti- Hearty red wine originating in Tuscany.
Porchetta- Whole, suckling pig flavored with fennel, peppercorns, and garlic and then roasted; popular entrée in Tuscany.
Ricotta- Soft cheese made from the whey of cow’s milk that is popular in central Italy.
Lasagna- Broad, ribbon-like pasta used in casserole dishes.
Penne- tubular pasta cut on the diagonal into pieces about an inch long.
Cannelloni- Ridged tubes of pasta that are designed to be filled with
Ravioli- Rectangular pasta pouches stuffed with group meat or cheese.
Manicotti- Long, plain tube of pasta appropriate for stuffing.
Parmesan- Hard cheese often aged for more than 2 years; frequently grated over Italian dishes.
Tortiglioni- tubular pasta with vertical ridges
Romano- Sharp, sheep’s milk cheese; very hard cheese, ideal for grating.
Fontina- Cheese well suited for making fondue; originally from Valle d’Aosta in northern Italy near Great St. Bernard Pass.
Gorgonzola- Blue-veined cheese that originated in Gorgonzola near Milan in northern Italy and is now produced in the Po Valley.
Mozzarella- Cheese used on pizzas, originally made from buffalo’s milk, but now often made from…